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Welcome…

… to the home of infectious disease research at the University of Lincoln! Based at the Joseph Banks Laboratories, School of Life Sciences, we are interested in a range of infectious diseases of clinical and economic importance to humans and animals. Our research programme is multidisciplinary, and includes clinical global health research with our international partners,  along with genomics and molecular epidemiology, and also wet-lab research into pathogen-pathogen interactions. Unlike many infectious disease research groups, we are not restricted to an individual pathogen, and have core expertise in both virology (betaherpesvirus infections, viral haemorrhagic fevers, and emerging infectious diseases) and bacteriology (Tuberculosis, pneumonia, sepsis & meningitis). This diverse range of collaborative research interests, combining laboratory and computer-based research, with clinical trials and epidemiological studies, allows us to target a broad range of funding streams, and is also central to our ethos of providing diverse and enriching research training opportunities for our students, equipping them with a range of knowledge and skills, tailored to their interests and current employment and PhD opportunities.

Training

MSC Student Projects V2.0

We provide research training in infectious diseases for undergraduate biomedical and bioveterinary science students, as well as post-graduate MSc Microbiology students at the School of Life SciencesUniversity of Lincoln, providing a range of research and skills-development opportunities. Projects typically combine work in one of our three realms of operation: The lab, the computer and the clinic, including field work with our global health implementing partners in Zambia (www.herpez.org). MSc students are encouraged to focus on their career development plan from day 1, to ensure they receive value for money and leave with the skills and experience required to fulfil their career ambitions.

Latest Publications

  1. Preventing Bloodstream Infections and Death in Zambian Neonates: Impact of a Low-cost Infection Control Bundle. Mwananyanda L, Pierre C, Mwansa J, Cowden C, Localio AR, Kapasa ML, Machona S, Musyani CL, Chilufya MM, Munanjala G, Lyondo A, Bates MA, Coffin SE, Hamer DH. Clin Infect Dis. 2018 Dec 28.
  2. Monkeypox – Enhancing public health preparedness for an emerging lethal human zoonotic epidemic threat in the wake of the smallpox post-eradication era. Petersen E, Abubakar I, Ihekweazu C, Heymann D, Ntoumi F, Blumberg L, Asogun D, Mukonka V, Lule SA, Bates M, Honeyborne I, Mfinanga S, Mwaba P, Dar O, Vairo F, Mukhtar M, Kock R, McHugh TD, Ippolito G, Zumla A. Int J Infect Dis. 2019 Jan;78:78-84.
  3. Achieving sustainable development goals for HIV/AIDS in the Republic of the Congo – Progress, obstacles and challenges in HIV/AIDS health services. Ghoma Linguissi LS, Lucaccioni V, Bates M, Zumla A, Ntoumi F. Int J Infect Dis. 2018 Dec;77:107-112.
  4. Children infected by human herpesvirus 6B with febrile seizures are more likely to develop febrile status epilepticus: A case-control study in a referral hospital in Zambia. Tembo J, Chandwe K, Kabwe M, Chilufya M, Ciccone O, Mpabalwani E, Ablashi D, Zumla A, Chen T, Bates M. J Med Virol. 2018 Nov;90(11):1757-1764.
  5. Tuberculosis: advances and challenges in development of new diagnostics and biomarkers. Walzl G, McNerney R, du Plessis N, Bates M, McHugh TD, Chegou NN, Zumla A. Lancet Infect Dis. 2018 Jul;18(7):e199-e210.
  6. Taking forward the Stop TB Partnership and World Health Organization Joint Theme for World TB Day March 24th 2018 – “Wanted: Leaders for a TB-Free World. You can make history. End TB”. Tiberi S, Petersen E, Maeurer M, Ntoumi F, Yeboa-Manu D, Mwaba P, Vilaplana C, Dar O, Bates M, Corrah T, Rao M, Kapata N, Azhar EI, Memish ZA, Mfinanga S, Aseffa A, Ippolito G, Migliori GB, Zumla A. Int J Infect Dis. 2018 Mar;68:122-124.
  7. Urgent need for multi-site controlled trials for CMV pneumonia treatment in African children. Tembo J, Moraleda C, Rojo P, Zumla A, Bates M. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2018 Apr 1;22(4):469-470.
  8. Clinical Efficacy, Safety, and Immunogenicity of a Live Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine (CYD-TDV) in Children: A Systematic Review with Meta-analysis. Malisheni M, Khaiboullina SF, Rizvanov AA, Takah N, Murewanhema G, Bates M. Front Immunol. 2017 Aug 4;8:863.
  9. Outcomes of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Zambia: a cohort analysis. Kapata N, Grobusch MP, Chongwe G, Chanda-Kapata P, Ngosa W, Tembo M, Musonda S, Katemangwe P, Bates M, Mwaba P, Zumla A, Cobelens F. Infection. 2017 Dec;45(6):831-839.
  10. Enhancing preparedness for tackling new epidemic threats. Zumla A, Ippolito G, McCloskey B, Bates M, Ansumana R, Heymann D, Kock R, Ntoumi F. Lancet Respir Med. 2017 Aug;5(8):606-608.
  11. Health systems in the Republic of Congo: challenges and opportunities for implementing tuberculosis and HIV collaborative service, research, and training activities. Linguissi LS, Gwom LC, Nkenfou CN, Bates M, Petersen E, Zumla A, Ntoumi F. Int J Infect Dis. 2017 Mar;56:62-67.
  12. Performance of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Polepole P, Kabwe M, Kasonde M, Tembo J, Shibemba A, O’Grady J, Kapata N, Zumla A, Bates M. Int J Mycobacteriol. 2017 Jan-Mar;6(1):87-93.
  13. The global dynamics of diabetes and tuberculosis: the impact of migration and policy implications. Girardi E, Sañé Schepisi M, Goletti D, Bates M, Mwaba P, Yeboah-Manu D, Ntoumi F, Palmieri F, Maeurer M, Zumla A, Ippolito G. Int J Infect Dis. 2017 Mar;56:45-53.
  14. Learning from epidemiological, clinical, and immunological studies on Mycobacterium africanum for improving current understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and for the development and evaluation of diagnostics, host-directed therapies, and vaccines for tuberculosis. Zumla A, Otchere ID, Mensah GI, Asante-Poku A, Gehre F, Maeurer M, Bates M, Mwaba P, Ntoumi F, Yeboah-Manu D. Int J Infect Dis. 2017 Mar;56:126-129.

Our core research partners

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